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Four New Dolls for Sale!

I’ve been working on 8 cm dolls for the past week or so. I think part of the reason why I’m doing that is because I’ve also been experimenting with recycled plastics and painting techniques to create tiny sets of wings. Eight centimeters (approximately 3 1/8 inches) may not sound like a large doll, but I’ve been working on dolls between 4 cm (1 5/8 inch) and 6 cm (2 3/8 inch) for the past few months, making 8 cm seem huge!

I’ve also been working on a method of creating and attaching tiny hair buns for the tiny doll series. Annikki and Norma are the two dolls I created using the new technique. I was trying to find a solution to not having pre-made pom-poms to use for tiny doll hairstyles. I tried creating some truly microscopic pom-poms myself and they just did not work. I tried creating some kind of frizzy yarn that could approximate a bun or poof. Again, they did not work. I also tried using commercially made wool balls, but they were too large and proved too dense. This made trying to sew on them a pain in the neck. The doll that became Annikki was a doll that had ‘slipped through the cracks’. I had made the doll, but had not created any clothing or hairstyle for her. Her body is made with a 40/60 wool/acrylic blend felt that I had a very small amount of. I remember thinking that I wanted to see if a wool blend felt would work for these tiny dolls. Wool can be stiffer and more dense than viscose and acrylic felts, which are super easy to use for these tiny dolls.

ANYWAY…

While sewing the light blue yarn onto Annikki’s head, it struck me that I could essentially do the exact same thing on a much smaller scale. I’d done it with the 4 cm doll heads. The hair buns that I wanted to make would be a little bit smaller than the 4 cm doll heads. In a nutshell, I just made a tiny doll head, and then sewed around the entire spherical stuffed felt piece, until the entire surface was covered in yarn.

To attach the buns to the head, I used some small pieces of toothpick (around 5 mm) to anchor each bun in place on the head. The toothpick was first glued into the hair bun and left to dry. Once dry, I glued each bun to Annikki’s head. Little hair ties and bows conveniently disguise any glue that might otherwise be seen.

 

Annikki, 8 cm

I also spent a lot of time creating the little white lacy edges to Annikki’s jacket, cuffs and dress hem. I used a 1mm crochet hook and a single strand of white embroidery floss for this. I have to say, this just about broke my eyeballs creating them. The embroidery floss strand was slippery and would just not cooperate sometimes. The edge of the skirt was easy, compared to the cuffs on the sleeves and the little collar for the jacket. GAH! My poor eyeballs! So, what do I do? I make another doll!

Norma, 6 cm

I guess that I thought that since I got through creating the crochet work for Annikki, that I needed to try the same techniques on a smaller doll? I’m not sure. Norma was all pieced. I just had to sew her together. There was so, much, cursing while I created the pink crocheted edges for Norma. I decided to be more elaborate with the cuffs of the sleeves and change around the collar of the blouse. GAH! So. Much. Cursing. Her hair buns were a cake-walk compared to the tiny crochet work. I decided to attach her buns without using toothpicks, and glued them straight to her head. It worked. I think that is due in large part to using Eri-Keeper (the Aleene’s Tacky Glue of Finland, only way, way, way stronger) and pinning them in place for the first part of drying.

I love the color I chose for Norma’s skin, but it never ever seems to show up well in the photos I take. I keep thinking that this may be due in part to my problems with seeing certain shades of purples, violets and browns. Many times, I cannot distinguish between those colors. It’s not a color blindness thing. I think it’s an ‘old eye’ thing. I only noticed this about six or seven years ago while teaching. Sometimes even pulling the color into the light doesn’t help, which leads me to believe it’s something to do with my age. Here is the color of the felt. It’s a delicious color!

The warming weather (3° C or 37.4° F) and longer, sunnier days (it was still kind of light at almost 20:00!) have gotten me thinking about flowers and sun and butterflies. It was only a matter of time anyway before I tried to create some little wings for the tiny dolls I’ve been making. I’d already created tiny wings from felt for the tiny bear series. My post on 6 April detailed my process of creating the wings. I’ve finished two tiny dolls with fairly wings. Here they are:

Maija (Purple Hair) and Inkeri (Pink Hair) Each of these dolls is approx. 8.5 cm tall.

I created tiny hair buns for Inkeri, but I didn’t have enough of the purple yarn to make buns for Maija, so she got sweet little sticky-uppy pig tails. I purposefully put them each in pants because I didn’t want to make them overly fairy-like. I also think that a skirt or outfit with a ton of embroidery would make the doll a bit too busy, and district from the wings. I think they turned out very sweet. I’ve not given them antenna, because I’m not sure about them. Again, I’m not a ‘fairy person’. It’s not that I dislike them. They just aren’t my ‘thing’. The fact that I’ve made these two dolls and more sets of wings, would point to the contrary, so here we are!

ANYWAY…

The hardest part of creating these dolls was attaching thing wings to the doll body. By the second time attaching wings, I’d figured out how I needed to do it without becoming too frustrated. I’m using rigid flat plastic from packaging that I’ve saved for the wings. Part of the difficulty of sewing them on is that the plastic is soft and thin enough for a sewing needle to go through it. I’ve made holes where I want to sew the wings on, and I need to pull the needle through those holes, not make new ones!

I think you can see the stitches a little better on Maija. I cut a slit in the back of the tunic so I could sew the wings directly onto the body. I wanted to make sure that they were firmly anchored to the torso. When I had them pinned for placement, I hated how the wings would wobble from side to side. I had thought that I might make the wings something that could be removed from the doll. Attach the wings to a little vest or jacket perhaps. Nope. I don’t like the wings wobbling about. Nope. Nope. Nope.

Yellow-ish outside, Pink inside
Blue outside, Yellow inside

The two sets of wings pictured above I created using the same technique as the wings that Inkeri and Maija have. An intaglio/monoprint printmaking technique, without actually creating a print. The intaglio holds the paint in place, and then I can wipe off successive layers of paint. Once dried, I seal the side of the wings that I’ve painted. The shinier side is the outside of the wing.

For the last set of wings I created, I sanded the plastic prior to scratching into the plastic sheet. This is similar how certain plastics (#6 polystyrene plastic) can be used to make a shrink plastic. Sanding the plastic allows colored pencil to adhere to the plastic, much like the commercially made Shrinky-Dink plastic. I wanted to see if I could retain a bit of the paint on the areas that I sanded. A certain amount did stay, but I think in the next try, I will sand the plastic with rougher sand paper to create a more interesting pattern.

Red on the outside and pinkish on the inside. They have a more frosted appearance.

I have three dolls for these three sets of wings. I need to think about what kinds of clothing I want to design for them. Before any of that, I’ll need to get their hair started. The sequences of construction are different from the tiny dolls I’ve been making that don’t have wings. I usually create the hairstyles near the very end of overall construction. With these dolls, the hair is done before the clothing is finished and the wings are attached.

All four of the dolls pictured, Annikki, Norma, Inkeri and Maija are listed in the ‘Artwork for Sale’ page of my website. If you are interested in purchasing any of my artwork, many of your questions can be answered on the ‘How To Buy’ page.

Thank you for reading,